Need Capital to Cover the Cost of Retaining Employees? Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Loans Might Be Right For You.

Posted by: Economic Development Team on Monday, April 6, 2020

This is the first in a series of blogs sharing information from a guide provided by Senator Ben Cardin’s office:  The Small Business Owner’s Guide to the CARES Act.

 

The Paycheck Protection Program is a forgivable loan that helps businesses keep their workforce employed during this COVID-19 crisis.  This includes self-employed business owners, sole proprietors, and independent contractors.  The money can also be used for such expenses as rent, mortgage and utilities.  According to the SBA, you can apply through any existing SBA 7(a) lender or through any federally insured depository institution, federally insured credit union,  and Farm Credit System institution that is participating.  But banks tell us that due to the demand,  most lenders are working with their existing clients first, so check with your bank to find out if they are a participating lender.  Download a sample application here. You can also visit the SBA’s PPP webpage.

The PPA program can provide cash-flow assistance through 100 percent federally guaranteed loans to employers who maintain their payroll during this emergency. SBA will forgive loans if all employees are kept on the payroll for eight weeks and the money is used for payroll, rent, mortgage interest, or utilities.  This helps workers remain employed and allows affected small businesses and our economy snap back more quickly after the crisis.

Small businesses and other eligible entities will be able to apply if they were harmed by COVID-19 between February 15, 2020 and June 30, 2020. This program would be retroactive to February 15, 2020, to help bring workers who may have already been laid off back onto payrolls. Loans are available through June 30, 2020.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

QUESTION: What types of businesses and entities are eligible for a PPP loan?

ANSWER:

  • Businesses and entities must have been in operation on February 15, 2020.
  • Small business concerns, as well as any business concern, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, a 501(c)(19) veterans organization, or Tribal business concern described in section 31(b)(2)(C) that has fewer than 500 employees, or the applicable size standard in number of employees for the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) industry as provided by SBA, if higher.
  • Individuals who operate a sole proprietorship or as an independent contractor and eligible self-employed individuals.
  • Any business concern that employs not more than 500 employees per physical location of the business concern and that is assigned a NAICS code beginning with 72, for which the affiliation rules are waived.
  • Affiliation rules are also waived for any business concern operating as a franchise that is assigned a franchise identifier code by the Administration, and company that receives funding through a Small Business Investment Company.

QUESTION: What are affiliation rules?

ANSWER: Affiliation rules become important when SBA is deciding whether a business’s affiliations preclude them from being considered “small.” Generally, affiliation exists when one business controls or has the power to control another or when a third party (or parties) controls or has the power to control both businesses. Please see this resource for more on these rules and how they can impact your business’s eligibility.

QUESTION: What types of non-profits are eligible?

ANSWER: In general, 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(19) non-profits with 500 employees or fewer as most nonprofit SBA size standards are based on revenue, not employee number. You can check here.

QUESTION: How is the loan size determined?

ANSWER: Depending on your business’s situation, the loan size will be calculated in different ways (see below). The maximum loan size is always $10 million. • If you were in business February 15, 2019 – June 30, 2019: Your max loan is equal to 250 percent of your average monthly payroll costs during that time period. If your business employs seasonal workers, you can opt to choose March 1, 2019 as your time period start date. • If you were not in business between February 15, 2019 – June 30, 2019: Your max loan is equal to 250 percent of your average monthly payroll costs between January 1, 2020 and February 29, 2020. • If you took out an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) between February 15, 2020 and June 30, 2020 and you want to refinance that loan into a PPP loan, you would add the outstanding loan amount to the payroll sum.

QUESTION: What costs are eligible for payroll?

ANSWER:

  • Compensation (salary, wage, commission, or similar compensation, payment of cash tip or equivalent) • Payment for vacation, parental, family, medical, or sick leave
  • Allowance for dismissal or separation
  • Payment required for the provisions of group health care benefits, including insurance premiums
  • Payment of any retirement benefit
  • Payment of State or local tax assessed on the compensation of employees

QUESTION: What costs are not eligible for payroll?

ANSWER:

  • Employee/owner compensation over $100,000 • Taxes imposed or withheld under chapters 21, 22, and 24 of the IRS code
  • Compensation of employees whose principal place of residence is outside of the U.S.
  • Qualified sick and family leave for which a credit is allowed under sections 7001 and 7003 of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

QUESTION: What are allowable uses of loan proceeds?

ANSWER:

  • Payroll costs (as noted above)
  • Costs related to the continuation of group health care benefits during periods of paid sick, medical, or family leave, and insurance premiums
  • Employee salaries, commissions, or similar compensations (see exclusions above)
  • Payments of interest on any mortgage obligation (which shall not include any prepayment of or payment of principal on a mortgage obligation)
  • Rent (including rent under a lease agreement)
  • Utilities
  • Interest on any other debt obligations that were incurred before the covered period

QUESTION: What are the loan terms, interest rate, and fees?

ANSWER: For any amounts not forgiven, the maximum term is 10 years, the maximum interest rate is 4 percent, zero loan fees, zero prepayment fee (SBA will establish application fees caps for lenders that charge).

QUESTION: How is the forgiveness amount calculated?

ANSWER: Forgiveness on a covered loan is equal to the sum of the following payroll costs incurred during the covered 8 week period compared to the previous year or time period, proportionate to maintaining employees and wages (excluding compensation over $100,000): • Payroll costs plus any payment of interest on any covered mortgage obligation (not including any prepayment or payment of principal on a covered mortgage obligation) plus any payment on any covered rent obligation plus and any covered utility payment.

QUESTION: How do I get forgiveness on my PPP loan?

ANSWER: You must apply through your lender for forgiveness on your loan. In this application, you must include:

  • Documentation verifying the number of employees on payroll and pay rates, including IRS payroll tax filings and State income, payroll and unemployment insurance filings.
  • Documentation verifying payments on covered mortgage obligations, lease obligations, and utilities.
  • Certification from a representative of your business or organization that is authorized to certify that the documentation provided is true and that the amount that is being forgiven was used in accordance with the program’s guidelines for use.

QUESTION: What happens after the forgiveness period?

ANSWER: Any loan amounts not forgiven are carried forward as an ongoing loan with max terms of 10 years, at a maximum interest rate of 4%. Principal and interest will continue to be deferred, for a total of 6 months to a year after disbursement of the loan. The clock does not start again.

QUESTION: Can I get more than one PPP loan?

Answer: No, an entity is limited to one PPP loan. Each loan will be registered under a Taxpayer Identification Number at SBA to prevent multiple loans to the same entity.

QUESTION: Where should I go to get a PPP loan from?

Answer: All current SBA 7(a) lenders (see more about 7(a) here) are eligible lenders for PPP. The Department of Treasury will also be in charge of authorizing new lenders, including nonbank lenders, to help meet the needs of small business owners. 

QUESTION: How does the PPP loan coordinate with SBA’s existing loans?

ANSWER: Borrowers may apply for PPP loans and other SBA financial assistance, including Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs), 7(a) loans, 504 loans, and microloans, and also receive investment capital from Small Business Investment Corporations (SBICs). However, you can not use your PPP loan for the same purpose as your other SBA loan(s). For example, if you use your PPP to cover payroll for the 8-week covered period, you cannot use a different SBA loan product for payroll for those same costs in that period, although you could use it for payroll not during that period or for different workers.

QUESTION: How does the PPP loan work with the temporary Emergency Economic Injury Grants and the Small Business Debt Relief program?

ANSWER: Emergency Economic Injury Grant and Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) recipients and those who receive loan payment relief through the Small Business Debt Relief Program may apply for and take out a PPP loan as long as there is no duplication in the uses of funds. Refer to those sections for more information.

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